A S H A  O F  A N T A R E S
Advanced PSI Since 1988

The Ancient Ones Speak Through Asha From The Future...Now


RETURN TO HOME PAGE

A S H A  O F  A N T A R E S

NUMEROLOGY SERIES

NUMBER 13

BIRTH  DEATH
RITUAL CEREMONY
FRIDAY THE 13TH  BAKER'S DOZEN

Is the number 13 lucky or unlucky?

13 represents those times in life when our status changes. Gestation
and birth are 13 entrances into the physical state by spirit; death
is also 13, as spirit departs the physical and enters the next state of being.

Throughout life we change our status - when we graduate from
school, when we marry and divorce or open our own business or
organization or project.

13 is a subset of the base vibration of 4,
ruler of that which has form (Read more about 4.)

As such, 13 rules the transitional states of our physical body,
birth death, walk-in experiences, possessions. Our legal status
being a construct, is a 4. Changing our legal status (married, divorced, single, etc.) or
residency is a 13. The change is also a 5. The transition and transformation
that involves the physical is the 13 and the structure comes
as a base 4 aspect.

In western cultures, 13 is the age of transition
from child to teenager and generally involves many new
environments for education, new forms of entertainment, new
responsibilities, and physical body changes. While not legally
adults yet, 13s are no longer children, but their own
unique state called, "teenager." At ages 18 and 21,
13 is seen in the form of high school graduation, joining
the military, obtaining the right to vote or drive.
Getting married, becoming engaged, having children, college graduation,
first employment - these are all 13s.

Ceremony is attached to 13. So is ritual. We celebrate births, engagements,
graduations, new jobs, New Year's, new drivers, marriages. We
hold wakes and funerals or funeral pyres for the deceased.
These ceremonies come in many forms from "cake and ice
cream" to brass bands and white horse-drawn carriages.
We toast the celebrant(s). We eulogize the deceased.

Birth and death are both entry-exit occasions...
Passing from spirit to spirit-in-physical and then from
spirit-in-physical to spirit. Bridges are symbolic of the passages.
So are rainbows and tunnels and wormholes, doorways, and
staircases. The boat over the River Stix carried the
Egyptians' deceased. The Vikings sent the deceased by ship as well.
Fire freed the spirit and gave the ashes back to
the physical world for some Native American and Eastern cultures.
Giving the body back to Earth by placing it under the ground,
alone or inside a clay pot, wood or metal casket; housing the
sarcophagus in its pyramid, burial at sea or atop the snow-covered
peak or volcano allowed the participants the opportunity
to say goodbye to the deceased or make
offering of him, to wish him well on the passage and hand him
over to his new guides in the other world. For
those who did not believe in the existence
of another world, ceremony allowed them to honor the memory of the
deceased and to show respect for his family. Saying goodbye
to the aged loved one who would by tradition wander the desert
canyons until they die and then be recycled naturally by
decomposition, natural preservation or predation by plants or animals
is also a ceremony and is a 13.

Is 13 lucky? 13 was seen as lucky in the
ancient past, a time of natural transitions and ceremonies.
In the Christian era its negative aspect related to the
Last Supper, in which 13 are in attendance, one being a deceiver.

In symbology, stars were 5-or 6-pointed and their
doubling would equal 10 or 12 points, with 13 being an
extra point. Even the 16-pointed star is an even number.

13 is one quarter of 52 and, therefore, can also represent a
season's length of 13 weeks.

Ancient Goddess ceremonies of male/female in which the act of joining
bodies represented mating with the god or goddess in ritual
is a 13. The male/female represented as joining bodies
and becoming "as one" and also "as one with the god/goddess
or other divine source" is a 13 in the representation
of ritual event. The act of becoming "one" is a transformative experience.
The ritual also included ceremony, which is 13 as well.

13 is transition of body and spirit. (See 3
for the creative and reproductive aspect of sex.) While
transformation itself is a 5 (change), the act of ritual transformation
from one state to another - as for example, shamanic states and
the bird/animal/man transformative states of being that
are seen in Native American societies is a 13. Ritual peyote,
ritual bathing, and sweatlodges are also 13s.
So is Holy Communion, Bar and Bat Mitzvahs.

As man loses sight of the spiritual, the "magical,"
the other-worldly of life, the ceremonial history of 13
has been increasingly forgotten and the idea of the
"one guest too many" at the Last Supper becomes the only association
many today can make to the number 13. But if one
takes a second look at that occasion, one remembers that the
"Last Supper" was a ceremony (complete with wine) and a
ritual ("in memory of me") in which bread and wine were substituted
for human sacrifice - bread representing the body and wine the blood of the
sacrifice. The ceremonial ritual portrait contains 13 persons, the
numerical symbols of ritual-ceremony.

Ritual sacrifice, can also take the form, for example of drowning one
member of the tribe in order for the crops to be good or
throwing one member of the tribe into the volcano
to save the island's population - both 13s.

13 being a subset of 4, 13 deals with the ceremony of
funerals and the transitional state of death; thus, 13's
association with death.

13 rules organizations and companies and armies and militias
and projects, all physical forms (4) that involve work (4).
Terrorist groups are 13. Fear generated is a 7,
but the levels of organization and the project with ritual
ceremony (goals and exercises) is a 13. That death is offered
up as martyrdom or as offering creates the sacrificial aspect of 13.
33s have the 13 aspect included, although
death may not be the avenue - time,
energy, money, personal space or privacy -
may be given by a 33.
The next time you eat cake and ice cream or give
a toast, remind yourself how "lucky" 13 can be.


A 13 poem by Rumi
includes the following:

"When I die I will soar with angels
and when I die to the angels
what I shall become you cannot imagine."


A 13 movie:
Joe vs The Volcano


A famous 13:
The 13 Colonies (U.S.)


ARE YOU A 13?

Your birthday is on the 13th of the month

Your month, day and 4-digit year add up to a 13

You were born in a 13 year.

Your name (one of them or all of
them combined) adds up to a 13.

You were the 13th child.

Your address has a 13 in it or
adds up to 13 (this will be an influencing location).


SOME 13 YEARS INCLUDE:

1903, 1912, 1921, 1930, 1939, 1948,
1957, 1966, 1975, 1984, 1993, 2011, 2029,

DON'T FORGET TO START WITH THE YEAR YOU
WERE CONCEIVED AND ALSO THE YEAR THAT YOU WERE BORN


If your birthday has more than one 13,
you are a double or triple 13
If the 13 is combined with a 22, 9, 5 or 7,
you are specializing in the lessens of this vibration
and will feel "larger than life experiences"
or feel the need to turn to a spiritual/creative
solution for such an intense program.
If a 12 or 15 is combined with the 13,
take good care of your health, especially with
alcohol and sex, speed and timing.

Remember, as with all experiences, spirit is given that
which it can handle and the guardians to assist!


SOME FAMOUS 13s: BORN ON THE 13TH OF THE MONTH

John D. Pershing, Claudette Colbert, Margaret Thatcher, Whoopi Goldberg,
Robert Louis Stevenson, Horatio Alger, Sophie Tucker, L.L. Bean,
Tennessee Ernie Ford, Kim Novak, Chuck Yeager, Grant Wood, Bess Truman,
Percival Lowell, L. Ron Hubbard, William Casey, William H. Macy,
Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Beckett, Garry Kasparov, Don Ho,
Joe Lewis, Dennis Rodman, William Butler Yeats, Ralph Edwards, Christo, Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen,
Cheech Marin, Dan Fogelberg, Fidel Castro, Jr.,
Alfred Hitchcock, Bert Lahr, Annie Oakley


NEXT PAGE

















Copyright 2007-2011.Asha Of Antares.Asha Ariel Aleia. All Rights Reserved.
Background courtesy:http://fractalontology.files.wordpress.com/2008/01/crackling-light.jpg